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COVD 2019 Annual Meeting
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April 9-13, 2019, Kansas City, Missouri

INFO TO KNOW
event
April 9-13, 2019
9-10: Pre-Meeting Courses
11-13: General Education
location_city
200 West 12th Street
Kansas City, Missouri 64105
PRE-MEETING COURSES
event April 9-10, 2019

Sports Vision: Reaching Peak Performance
Alexandar Andrich, OD, FCOVD
Alexandar Andrich, OD, FCOVD
Let the games begin! Sports vision training is one of the best kept secrets in all of sports. With the advancement in technology for training procedures and activities, optometrists are poised to be the leaders in the field of sports performance enhancement. This course will cover testing and training of athletes along with practice management tips. Visual skills required for sports will be covered along with visual skill analysis for various sports. Hands-on activities will be performed allowing participants to optimize learning and familiarity with techniques and equipment. Additional topics to be discussed include advancements in nutrigenomics/epigenetics, protective eyewear/tints, and vision rehabilitation following sports related concussion.

The Balancing Act: Developmental Principles and Neurology for Better Patient Outcomes
Curtis Baxstrom, OD, FCOVD and Jason Clopton, OD, FCOVD
Curtis Baxstrom, OD, FCOVD and Jason Clopton, OD, FCOVD
This course will be an introductory overview of where VT began and where we are going. We will first review the history of vision therapy and how it is moving toward a neurologically-based program. This is because of the increased interest in the area of visual neuro-rehabilitation of acquired brain injuries and the use of 97000 billing codes which have been approved for optometry. The first part of the course will be reviewing functional vs. pathological disorders and how to order appropriate imaging for patients with amblyopia, ocular motor and binocular conditions. These cases will then be followed regarding treatment and follow-up. This will be done in the context of how we can improve vision therapy with the addition of vestibular, motor and cervical components. These additions are developmentally and neurologically based and make our therapy even more efficacious. We will review cases and provide a number of vision therapy activities that will be presented in a manner that so you can take them and modify the demand up and down in regards to your patient’s abilities. By learning the therapeutic value of the procedures and how to apply them, you will grow from a cook to a chef of vision therapy. The level of the course is designed for experienced therapists and upward.

Lenses, Prisms, & TBI
Robert Fox, OD, FCOVD
Robert Fox, OD, FCOVD
The developmental optometrist plays a key role in the treatment of patients with acquired brain injuries. Dr Fox will present an integrative approach to the diagnosis and management of the patient with TBI. TBI management in both the private practice and in the acute care settings will be discussed. This approach includes lenses, prisms, neuro-optometric therapy, and more. Hands-on lab time will include the use lenses and prisms in the therapy setting.

VT 301: Visual-Perceptual Motor Information Processing & Integration favorite
Thomas Headline, COVT and Julie Petteruto, COVT
Thomas Headline, COVT and Julie Petteruto, COVT
This course will discuss various Visual-Perceptual Motor Evaluation techniques so that the vision therapist has an understanding about a patient’s level of ability in each of the various skill areas. Visual-Perceptual Motor Information Processing &Integration Therapy procedures will be demonstrated and experienced in this workshop-heavy presentation. Participants are highly encouraged to participate in workshop activities, wear comfortable clothing and removable shoes and may bring a personal yoga mat. It is highly recommended that participants have previously attended a VT 101 course or have strong understanding of visual concepts, the tools of vision therapy and visual terminology. Participants will be provided a list of recommended equipment to bring which will facilitate their full engagement during the workshops.
Day one will introduce the various areas of Visual-Perceptual Motor Skills and methods these may be evaluated and measured. We will also explore and discuss vision therapy programming considerations and begin introducing and workshopping Visual-Perceptual Motor procedures. Day two will pick up from Day one with continued Visual-Perceptual Motor procedure demonstrations and workshops. Also, participants will apply and demonstrate the concepts presented through VT Procedure creation for specific skill emphasis.

New Advances in Strabismus & Amblyopia Treatment
Robert Sanet, OD, FCOVD
Robert Sanet, OD, FCOVD
This 2-day course will provide attendees with an understanding of amblyopia and strabismus including eccentric fixation and anomalous correspondence and effective evaluation techniques to determine the prognosis in amblyopia, exotropia and esotropia. I will provide an overview of myths and misconceptions regarding amblyopia and strabismus and review scientific studies on the underlying cause of amblyopia and strabismus and treatment options including patching, surgery and optometric vision therapy. This course will conclude with easy-to-follow, sequential and effective vision therapy treatment procedures for amblyopia, exotropia, and esotropia.

VT101 favorite
Jessica Stevenson, COVT and Robert Nurisio, COVT
Jessica Stevenson, COVT and Robert Nurisio, COVT
This course is designed for the entry-level vision therapist to acquaint them with an understanding of the visual process and the tools implemented by vision therapist under the direction of their optometrist to address a variety of visual issues. In addition, participants will learn specific vision therapy procedures to train individual visual skills as well as how to modify these procedures to the appropriate demand level for their given patient. Participants should arrive with a basic understanding of optometric terminology as related to refractive errors and anatomical structures of the eyes.

TEAM Approachfavorite
Nancy Torgerson, OD, FCOVD and Jenny Rea, COVT
Nancy Torgerson, OD, FCOVD and Jenny Rea, COVT
“The size of your dreams must always exceed your current capacity to achieve them. If your dreams do not scare you, they are not big enough.” - Ellen Johnson Sirleaf.
What is your dream for your team and for each member? Are team members proud of the job they are doing? Do they find joy in being a part of enhancing the lives of others through vision? Do you treat team members well and give the tools needed to do a great job? The visionary approach to patient care is to put your team first by equipping and empowering each one with the why and how they make a difference. By putting the TEAM first, it empowers the TEAM with the tools to put patients first and deliver excellent patient care.
Are team expectations and culture known or is it tricky to figure out? Does each team member have the safety and support to ask questions, bring up challenges with supportive solutions without being blatantly rejected?
This course will aim to help you:
  • create a culture that is primed for development and growth by fostering safety through engagement, understanding and inclusive decision making.
  • understand how you and each TEAM member have a dominant TENDENCY in response to expectations,
  • learn how you can shape your Tendency to help impact happiness, creativity and productivity for you and the TEAM,
  • morph from a hoarder of praise to becoming a praise provider,
  • learn techniques such as the art of Mental Aikido to redirect second hand stress to enhance outcomes,
  • and explore new research on how mindsets are inter-connected and how a fixed mindset may be more contagious than a growth mindset and how a single positive person can end up creating a ripple effect of positivity that infects those around them
Frustration develops when our expectations do not equal reality. Perception of challenges are reduced by those we have around us. Learn skills to help reframe challenges and reduce frustration. Whether you are an optometrist, vision therapist, boss, manager or patient care coordinator, this workshop is for you.
When we put our TEAM first, the patient ultimately comes first.

GENERAL EDUCATION
event April 11-13, 2019

Vision & Time Travel: Visual Memory, Visualization and Visual Prediction favorite
Michelle Beatty, COVT
“Vision consists of insight, sight, foresight and hindsight...” - John Streff, O.D.
This course will introduce therapists to the understanding of time as it relates to the development of visual memory, visualization & visual prediction, as well as provide tools to aid patients in gaining these skills.

Infant Vision Development Video Case Presentation
Brandon Begotka, OD, FCOVD
An understanding of the course and characteristics of vision development in infants is foundational in the developmental optometrist’s model of vision.  Video documentation of important stages in infant vision development will be presented and their theoretical and practical implications will be discussed.

Working with Infants and Toddlers in the VT Room favorite
Brandon Begotka, OD, FCOVD and Brian Delfosse, COVT

Vision Education Advocacy
Jennifer Kungle, OD, FCOVD
Review of education laws and surrounding 504 plans and IEP’s; along with relevant accommodations appropriate for patients with visual disabilities. 

The Way We Tell It: Communicating Difficult Concepts about Vision, Simply, and Effectively
Robert Lederman, OD, FCOVD
We've all experienced how challenging it can be trying to explain our model of vision to professionals and parents alike. Sometimes it can be disheartening and frustrating. For nearly thirty years, Robert Lederman has been presenting to teachers, psychologists, neurologists, occupational therapists and ophthalmologists, and talking about vision. This year he's coming to COVD to share with us the ways that he has found to successfully convey what we mean when we talk about vision beyond 20/20.
Day one will introduce the various areas of Visual-Perceptual Motor Skills and methods these may be evaluated and measured. We will also explore and discuss vision therapy programming considerations and begin introducing and workshopping visual-perceptual-motor procedures. Day two will pick up from Day one with continued visual-perceptual-motor procedure demonstrations and workshops. Also, participants will apply and demonstrate the concepts presented through VT Procedure creation for specific skill emphasis.

Working with Patients on the Autism Spectrum: What's New
Patricia Lemer, MEd, NCC

In the past five years, understanding of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) has deepened. Researchers and scientists now recognize that ASDs have a biologically basis, with a complex interaction among the immune, neurological, endocrine and visual systems. Sophisticated laboratory procedures allow us to see inside the guts, brains, cells and eyes of those with autism. The word “microbiome” has entered our vocabulary; understanding the microbiome is the key to understanding autism.
Essential treatment options include diet, microbiome restoration, reflex integration, vagus nerve rebalancing, detoxification, vision therapy and more. These important tools can be integrated into the arsenals of optometrists, as well as provide opportunities for collaboration with like-minded colleagues in other disciplines.
In this presentation by a counselor with over 40 years’ experience, optometrists will learn about “new thinking” re autism etiology and treatments, based on “exposomics,” or the science of how an individual’s lifetime environmental exposures affect health. The first hour will emphasize biomedical issues in autism and how vision is affected by inflammation, gut issues, and toxicity. The second hour will focus on complementary tools that the optometrist can use when treating vision issues in individuals with autism spectrum disorders.


Straight Talk about Strabismus: A Clinical Perspective 
Robin Lewis, OD, FCOVD

The course shows how modern evidence supports the historic developmental basis of treating amblyopia and strabismus; and how some historical mechanical notions about the development of vision, especially in strabismus and amblyopia, have limited our success in the past, but need not limit our successes in the future.


Vision and Executive Function
Kavita Malhotra, OD, FCOVD

Executive functioning skills are an important component of self-regulation and direction. These skills are a core part of most psychoeducational and neuropsychological evaluations. Vision therapy can play a key role in improving executive functioning skills which leads to enhanced performance in overall function. An overview of various aspects of executive function and how it is tested is presented, as well as how it ties in to behavior observed in everyday life and during optometric vision therapy sessions. A guide to modifying existing visual rehabilitation procedures, as well as novel therapy procedures to improve executive function skills, are presented. This course also highlights tools useful tools for discussing  the impact of vision therapy/visual rehabilitation on executive functioning skills, which can help bridge the communication gap between developmental optometrists, other professionals, and parents


Drug Abuse and Side Effects Masquerading as Functional Vision Disorders
Jack Richman, OD, FCOVD
Attendees will learn to recognize the various visuomotor problems encountered by concussion patients, understand the variability of presentation and duration of symptoms, analyze the whole patient’s situation to best develop of practical treatment plan, and and identify patient needs to enable a concussion team to get involved and work together.

A Neuro-ophthalmology Perspective of Concussion and Neuro-visual Rehabilitation
Eric Singman, MD, PhD

Nearly a quarter of American high schoolers use at least one type of illicit drug. These include such drugs as amphetamines, marijuana, tranquilizers, narcotics, cough medicine, and inhalants. Drug use is fairly prevalent among college students, and such drug use often persists after graduation. In college students, the use of drugs, e.g., Adderall and other so-called “study drugs”, has skyrocketed over the past two decades with marijuana being the one most commonly used. Many children, teenagers, and young adults receive medications for psychiatric disorders. The national annual prescribing patterns of stimulant, antidepressant, and antipsychotic medications to children and young people (ages 6 to 24) revealed that almost one in twelve were using such medications. Optometrists often examine children and young adults who present with signs and symptoms of functional vision problems, e.g., eye movement, accommodative, or binocular disorders. It is possible that these symptoms may be related to the side-effects of prescription medications or the effects of substance abuse.


Vision: Its Link to All Aspects of Development
Glen T. Steele, OD, FCOVD

Determining how well a child is meeting milestones in early development relies primarily on observing the manner in which an infant or young child looks and engages in their individual environment. The child who develops appropriate looking patterns will be judged to be socially, emotionally, and cognitively well-ahead of those who do not. This course will address the specific associations of vision and overall development in determining appropriate development and timelines for intervention.


How to Add a Concussion/mTBI Specialty to Your Optometric Vision Therapy Practice
Barry Tannen, OD, FCOVD 
This course will cover all the nuts and bolts of a vision/concussion practice, based on the experience of working with thousands of post-concussion/mTBI patients. Covered in detail will be high-yield diagnostic tests (including newer diagnostic tests for visual motion sensitivity and selective photosensitivity), advanced lens prescriptions (including therapeutic tints, binasal occlusion, yoked and fusional prism), and neuro-optometric vision therapy techniques specific to this interesting and challenging patient population.

Clinical Pearls and Tips for Working with Concussed Patients  favorite
Barry Tannen, OD, FCOVD and Jennifer Mullen, COVT

FOR VISION THERAPISTS

 PRE-MEETING COURSE  event April 9-10, 2019
VT 301: Visual-Perceptual Motor Information Processing & Integration 
Thomas Headline, COVT and Julie Petteruto, COVT
Thomas Headline, COVT and Julie Petteruto, COVT
This course will discuss various Visual-Perceptual Motor Evaluation techniques so that the vision therapist has an understanding about a patient’s level of ability in each of the various skill areas. Visual-Perceptual Motor Information Processing &Integration Therapy procedures will be demonstrated and experienced in this workshop-heavy presentation. Participants are highly encouraged to participate in workshop activities, wear comfortable clothing and removable shoes and may bring a personal yoga mat. It is highly recommended that participants have previously attended a VT 101 course or have strong understanding of visual concepts, the tools of vision therapy and visual terminology. Participants will be provided a list of recommended equipment to bring which will facilitate their full engagement during the workshops.
Day one will introduce the various areas of Visual-Perceptual Motor Skills and methods these may be evaluated and measured. We will also explore and discuss vision therapy programming considerations and begin introducing and workshopping Visual-Perceptual Motor procedures. Day two will pick up from Day one with continued Visual-Perceptual Motor procedure demonstrations and workshops. Also, participants will apply and demonstrate the concepts presented through VT Procedure creation for specific skill emphasis.

 PRE-MEETING COURSE  event April 9-10, 2019
VT 101
Jessica Stevenson, COVT and Robert Nurisio, COVT
Jessica Stevenson, COVT and Robert Nurisio, COVT
This course is designed for the entry-level vision therapist to acquaint them with an understanding of the visual process and the tools implemented by vision therapist under the direction of their optometrist to address a variety of visual issues. In addition, participants will learn specific vision therapy procedures to train individual visual skills as well as how to modify these procedures to the appropriate demand level for their given patient. Participants should arrive with a basic understanding of optometric terminology as related to refractive errors and anatomical structures of the eyes.

 PRE-MEETING COURSE  event April 10, 2019
TEAM Approach
Nancy Torgerson, OD, FCOVD and Jenny Rea, COVT
Nancy Torgerson, OD, FCOVD and Jenny Rea, COVT
“The size of your dreams must always exceed your current capacity to achieve them. If your dreams do not scare you, they are not big enough.” - Ellen Johnson Sirleaf.
What is your dream for your team and for each member? Are team members proud of the job they are doing? Do they find joy in being a part of enhancing the lives of others through vision? Do you treat team members well and give the tools needed to do a great job? The visionary approach to patient care is to put your team first by equipping and empowering each one with the why and how they make a difference. By putting the TEAM first, it empowers the TEAM with the tools to put patients first and deliver excellent patient care.
Are team expectations and culture known or is it tricky to figure out? Does each team member have the safety and support to ask questions, bring up challenges with supportive solutions without being blatantly rejected?
This course will aim to help you:
  • create a culture that is primed for development and growth by fostering safety through engagement, understanding and inclusive decision making.
  • understand how you and each TEAM member have a dominant TENDENCY in response to expectations,
  • learn how you can shape your Tendency to help impact happiness, creativity and productivity for you and the TEAM,
  • morph from a hoarder of praise to becoming a praise provider,
  • learn techniques such as the art of Mental Aikido to redirect second hand stress to enhance outcomes,
  • and explore new research on how mindsets are inter-connected and how a fixed mindset may be more contagious than a growth mindset and how a single positive person can end up creating a ripple effect of positivity that infects those around them
Frustration develops when our expectations do not equal reality. Perception of challenges are reduced by those we have around us. Learn skills to help reframe challenges and reduce frustration. Whether you are an optometrist, vision therapist, boss, manager or patient care coordinator, this workshop is for you.
When we put our TEAM first, the patient ultimately comes first.

Vision & Time Travel: Visual Memory, Visualization and Visual Prediction 
Michelle Beatty, COVT
“Vision consists of insight, sight, foresight and hindsight...” - John Streff, O.D.
This course will introduce therapists to the understanding of time as it relates to the development of visual memory, visualization & visual prediction, as well as provide tools to aid patients in gaining these skills.

Clinical Pearls and Tips for Working with Concussed Patients
Barry Tannen, OD, FCOVD and Jennifer Mullen, COVT

Working with Infants and Toddlers in the VT Room
Brandon Begotka, OD, FCOVD and Brian Delfosse, COVT

FOR STUDENTS & RESIDENTS
location_city
200 West 12th Street
Kansas City, Missouri 64105